Know Your Signer

With our flexible authentication structure, you have five options to prove your signers' identities

digital signature identity authentication3



Any time you do business online, you need to know who you're doing business with, and digital signatures are no exception. If a signed document is challenged in court, you'll have to prove the signer’s identity. At SIGNiX, we know that not all of your documents come with the same level of risk, which is why we offer several ways to prove your signers’ identities.

 

With SIGNiX, you can pick different authentication
methods to each party in the same transaction.






1. EMAIL-ONLY AUTHENTICATION

Description: Proves a user has access to a specific email address

Use Case: Limited situations, when level of risk is very low

In Operation: A user is sent an email with a link to the transaction. If the user receives the email and clicks on the link, SIGNiX considers the user "authenticated," and the transaction continues. 

2. SUPPLIED QUESTIONS

Description: Leverages information known by the customer about the end user, including account number or other information not widely known outside the relationship between customer and end user

Use Case: Typically used alongside other authentication models to add additional strength

In Operation: An email gives the signer a link to the transaction. Once the signer consents to use e-signatures, they’re asked to answer to questions generated by the customer, which could be shared secrets. If the user successfully answers the challenge questions, SIGNiX considers the user “authenticated,” and the transaction continues.

3. SPONSORED/PASS-THROUGH

Description: Leverages authentication provided by an integrated partner’s system

Use Case: Typical for integrated models where customer or partner already has trusted authentication models in place and prefers to rely on them based on desired user experience

In Operation: A user may or may not be sent an email with a link to the transaction, depending on the integration. Instead SIGNiX’s client or partner authenticates the user within their own system, according to their own best practices. If the authentication is successful, SIGNiX will grant access to the transaction. In this model, the client/partner assumes responsibility for the authentication of the user.

digital signature identity authentication

4. TEXT MESSAGE AUTHENTICATION

Description: Sends a text message with a one-time password to a user’s mobile phone to prove the signer has access to an email address and a specific cell phone number

Use Case: For customers looking for an inexpensive, convenient multifactor authentication with a low burden on the end user

In Operation: An email gives the signer a link to the transaction. Once the signer consents to use e-signatures, SIGNiX sends them a text message containing a random, one-time password. If the user enters the text message code correctly, SIGNiX considers the user “authenticated,” and the transaction continues.

5. KNOWLEDGE-BASED AUTHENTICATION (KBA)

Description: Asks the user very specific questions about past residences, possessions and transactions based on 30 years of public databases to prove that a user possesses significantly privileged information

Use Case: This is the highest form of remote authentication available, and it’s best for transactions where the identity of the signer must be abundantly clear, including loan documents, high value trades or real estate closings

In Operation: An email gives the signer a link to the transaction. Once the user consents to use e-signatures, the user is first prompted for the last four digits of their social security number and date of birth. If they answer correctly, they’re prompted with a set of four multiple choice questions. If the signer successfully answers the questions as outlined above, SIGNiX considers the user “authenticated,” and the transaction continues.

 

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digital signature testimonial reiniger

quoteMark

The SIGNiX platform establishes a trustworthy process for binding the identity of an individual to a digital signature. This is crucially important.

 
—Timothy Reiniger, lawyer and member of the Electronic Discovery and Digital Evidence Committee of the American Bar Association